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which scope for engineer/automotive enthusiast?

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29 May 2019 20:12 #30229 by Jim22
I'm sorry, I know this has been discussed over and over, maybe my situation is slightly different...

I am in the market for a scope to use on auto repair as a DIY. I am also an Electrical / Computer Engineer, with a degree and 30 years experience in embedded software and hardware. I have used sophisticated storage scopes on digital circuits and motor controls. I try to troubleshoot and repair my cars as needed, with various degrees of success. At the moment, I have a Ford Ranger V3.0 that just "doesn't sound right" under load, and I'm interested in checking things like cam/crank timing and spark quality, etc.

I have a few hundred dollars I can spend, I would prefer not to waste it on a tool which will just frustrate me. I am looking at the Hantek USB scopes like the 1008C and the various other Hantek 4 channel models. I don't currently own any scope accessories, so the full kits look appealing. I am fully aware that these scopes have rather unsophisticated input circuitry and software, as well as limited storage ability. It also seems there are software installation challenges and that probably Hantek does not provide the most robust or rich featured software. I see on the Hantek web site that they have a downloadable SDK, and I most likely have the skills needed to write some software. I am very familiar with Visual Basic, for instance, and have written quite a bit of communication-intense software.

I've also looked a bit at the Autel scope, which looks like it is probably a Hantek under the hood. I don't see a whole lot of good info on the Autel software, I would be using it with a laptop. I also don't see an SDK for it. I suspect the Autel has somewhat better input circuitry.

So, now that you know a little about me, what would you recommend? If the Hantek and/or the Autel are likely to be junk, I could spend a bit more. Real 4-channel storage scopes get a bit pricey, seems like $600 or so with no accessories. That is starting to get to be a lot of $$$ for something I've lived this long without.

Thanks in advance,
Jim

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29 May 2019 20:32 #30230 by PDM
Welcome Jim.

I’m an engineer and DIYer myself.

Personally, I couldn’t get past the headaches that seem to plague the automotive scopes and just can’t justify a Pico for personal use. I went with a Siglent handheld DSO and bought quality leads and probes from aeswave. It has served me well. There is good info here on budget automotive scopes if you want to go that route.

Paul’s (scanner danner) book is a must have as well.
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29 May 2019 21:42 #30231 by Jim22
Hmmm, I was afraid of that. That sent me off looking at benchtop scopes. I like the prices on the Rigol DS1054Z, and also the GW Instek GDS-1054B. The Rigol appears to have some options that you can purchase later if I ever needed them. 4 channels appeals to me, but I might be able to live with 2. I would still need some accessories.

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01 Jun 2019 01:33 - 01 Jun 2019 01:42 #30276 by Andy.MacFadyen
Replied by Andy.MacFadyen on topic which scope for engineer/automotive enthusiast?
Finding an expensive automotive scope is easy, finding a budget scope isn't. also a scope that is a good buy in the EU might not be in the US or Australia and vice versa. So leaving out, entry level Pico, uScope and 2nd user Snap-On and the awful Hantek this my take

I mainly use my Owon scopes a DSO71020v with the optional battey and a VDS1022I and like them both. As with any non-automotive scope both lack f a scale for use with an x20 attenuator.

The VDS1022I produces nice clean traces the hardware although entry level is much superior to the Hantek and the software is really nice to use , it is great value for money but it remains an entry level scope, and the faster scopes in the Owon VDS range are much more expensive.

Only issues with the DSO7102v are short battery life and while it is great used as a stand alone item of equipment if you connect to a PC the software is a bit dated and "clunky"..


Getting more expensive but still very cheap compared to a Snap-On or Automotive Pico you should consider Ditex -- Auto Ditex a Bulgarian company have been making automotive scopes for ten years, they are actively developing supporting their products I have couple of items of Ditex equioment and the quality is first class I have also talked to the product developer on Facebook and is really into supporting his product. Ditex are great value for money in Euro but probably not so in the US.

"There's always a catch ---- Catch OBD2 ."


Last edit: 01 Jun 2019 01:42 by Andy.MacFadyen.
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19 Jun 2019 19:34 - 19 Jun 2019 19:38 #30822 by chisel
PDM, What do you think of the presets and application specific software on the automotive scopes, are they valuable or not worth the cost?

Could someone with no scope experience be able to use the Siglent handheld for automotive troubleshooting without the above?

Regards.
Last edit: 19 Jun 2019 19:38 by chisel.

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21 Jun 2019 08:48 #30865 by PDM
The automotive scopes are definitely a time saver. I have a notebook/cheat sheet for my settings that works for as often as I have to use it. The biggest headache for me is reviewing a capture. Again, flash cards or cheat sheets make this less cumbersome. What did the trick for me was to grab a scope, user manual, and a notebook. Pick a system (injectors, ignition, cmp/ckp, etc) on a known good vehicle and go through a diagnosis. I now have great notes on how to interpret a signal from amp clamps and kv probes as well as how to record and review a capture. The handheld scope also makes for an excellent high speed DVOM
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